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City Council member proposes law in response to investigation

Posted: April 6, 2016 | Tags: police

A D.C. lawmaker floated a bill Tuesday that would raise the standards police must meet to carry out search warrants and require the city to pay for property damage when officers raid the wrong houses.

D.C. Council member David Grosso (I-At Large), the bill’s sponsor, said the measure was designed to prevent erroneous searches and give residents a clear course of action if police mistakenly raid their home.

Grosso said the bill was a response to a Washington Post investigation of 2,000 search warrants that found 284 cases in which D.C. police searched homes for drugs and guns without observing criminal activity on the property. The Post identified a dozen cases in recent years in which police searched homes using incorrect or outdated address information. The raids occurred almost exclusively in black communities.

Read more on the follow-up to the Post investigation, "Probable Cause," which was reported and researched by students at the Investigative Reporting Workshop, including Hawkins, a graduate student and an intern at the Workshop.




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